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also e-mail us. we're asking you this morning your advice for the second obama administration. isedobama speech rate stark choices, says the new york times. we would like to hear from you this morning, what you think republican options are and what your advice is. here's what's happening on capitol hill today. house gop poised to extend the debt limit. that's the headline in "usa today." the bill would buy time and would set the stage for a physical fight. house republicans are scheduled to vote today to extend a $16.40 trillion at the opening salvo in a renewed battle this year to pass a federal budget and reduce the debt. the headline in the washington times, the front page looks like this -- the reporter on that story and joins us now from the "washington times. good morning and thanks for being with us. guest: thanks for having me. host: when do we expect the vote and why is it significant? guest: because we are fresh off the president's inauguration, it is significant. the fight over the debt ceiling in many ways has defined the last two years as far as spending, because
's not been an attempt to have stability in libya. the obama administration has been repeating the mistake that the bush administration made in iraq and afghanistan. they were focused on the military campaign but not focus on the nation building. we have paid a huge cost for that in iraq afghanistan. a lot of the arms in the arsenal of muammar gaddafi have been smuggled into countries like y fueled a the fi fresh insurgency. we have taken our eye off the ball in libya ever since the overthrow of gaddafi. that's the big issue from the hearings. host: our guest is max boot, senior fellow with the council on foreign relations. was a senior foreign policy adviser to the john mccain campaign in 2008. he is the author of a new book called "invisible armies." a little more about the faces of your book -- a little more about the thesis of your book. this idea of guerrilla warfare is not something new. guest: i exam the long history of insurgency and guerrilla warfare and it predates conventional conflicts. tribal warfare is essentially grow warfare. conventional warfare is a relatively recent inve
the conversation, here are the numbers to call -- host: we're looking at promises made in the obama administration. what counts as a promise kept? what counts as a promise broken? guest: we were inventing a new form of journalism. the beauty of the obameter is you can look things up by subject, by reading. a lot of critics like to focus on the things that we call promises broken. we had to define what was a promise kept and what was a promise broken. how did we define a promise? we defined it promised as a guarantee of prospective action that was verifiable, then we read it typically into one of two ratings. in the work that there was some sort of progress toward fulfilling or stalled if there was a lack of progress. at a point that we felt like we could judge completion, with an decided whether it was kept were broken. kept is pretty much you hear it, the promise has been substantially or completely fulfilled, broken, not fulfilled pretty trickier ones are compromise, to where there has been some progress, where there has been a partial achievement of the goal. ultimately these are judgment calls
economic recovery and economic prosperity in america. they feel president obama is not getting behind this surplus we have. you heard the caller touch upon that when he mentioned what happened, on the moratorium on drilling. it was contested in court and the administration lost that fight. there is a question about how much obama will get behind that. yesterday he talked about climate change and other things. i think the next four years may be tough for energy producers. guest: natural gas has become so plentiful and prices have come down so much that is changing a lot of the economics of the energy industry. that plays right into the question of climate change policy. to the degree that natural gas which is cleaner than coal begins to replace coal as the primary fuel for power plants, that reduces carbon emissions. all of these things are sort of working together. the administration keeps pointing out that oil and gas production is higher than it has ever been and that is true as the economy comes back but there is an inherent tension between some of this energy policy and a job poli
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4